currently writing 05.10.18

!CW

This header is a lie, I haven’t written anything lately. I was in Spain and Portugal for a week at the end of April and haven’t stopped working since I got back. May is always a crazy month for me-both work-wise and personally. However, I have a free day this weekend and am hoping to get back to work on DB’s sequel now that I got over the hump of rewriting that one scene three times haha.

It’s Thursday, which means #ThursdayAesthetic! I’m a week behind on posting so this was last week’s theme of ‘minor characters’. You hear enough about Alba, so here are my other three POV characters as well as a bonus fave side character:

 

[AES] TA MINOR-CORA

CORA 
-Lord of Tartarus, the Underworld’s prison realm
-Death’s Second in Command
-Demon Twin
-Disaster Gay
If you’re not sure if you’re terrified or turned on—don’t worry, that’s normal.

[AES] TA MINOR-DOM

DOM 
-Death’s Third in Command
-Demon Twin
-Prince of Hell
-God of Nightmares (dressed as a daydream)
Enjoys long walks through Hell, pushing everyone’s buttons, and always having the last word.

[AES] TA MINOR-BANE

BANE
-Emissary to the Realms
-Son of a witch (literally)
-Heir of Chaos
-Always Broody
-Concealing at least four weapons at all times
Hella bossy, lonely af, really needs a hug—and a way out of his blood oath to the gods.

 

 

[AES] TA MINOR-HARLOW

HARLOW 
-Love’s Second in Command
-Heir of Chaos & War
-Favorite Book: 174 Ways To Kill A Man
-Just wants to paint
“That’s why her hair’s so big, it’s full of secrets,” said by someone at some point, probably.

currently writing 04.19.18

!CW

Slowly but surely, DB’s sequel is now at 24,000 words! I had to rewrite a scene three times to finally get the right vibe and pacing, so hopefully, I can pick back up the pace again. The sequel has evolved a lot in this rewrite, and the subplots are much stronger for it, but I’m excited to get back to the core of the action in the coming scenes.

It’s Thursday, which means #ThursdayAesthetic!! aka my favorite writing twitter hashtag. This week’s theme was ‘antagonist’ to juxtapose last week’s theme of ‘protagonist’. I struggled with this one as I didn’t want to give away who my villain was, so I went with a broader theme, that of Alba vs. the gods. So, here’s an aesthetic for the gods, who are far too extravagant and very fond of golden decor, secrets, and getting away with murder.

[AES] TA VILLAIN CHALLENGE

!CW

I just hit 10,000 words on the sequel to Death Becoming! I had about 30,000 words written before deciding to scrap it all and start anew, given all the changes DB underwent in edits. I can’t begin to describe how good it feels to be writing new things again after nearly a year of edits. To celebrate, here’s a moodboard I made for the #ThursdayAesthetic challenge on Twitter.

[AES] CR

 

Week In Review 2/16/18

!CLU

This past weekend, Lucas and I escaped the Chicago blizzard and headed to Minneapolis. Which sounds so backwards that they would have better weather, but never fear, the temps were in the negatives the whole time, just not snowing, thank goodness. We brought our sweet wolfpup Freya with us and she had tons of fun socializing with our friends’ dogs, and she slept for two days straight after we got back.

I got to meet my internet friend, Brenna, in person for the first time (!!!), which was super awesome. We also got to visit Lucas’s brother and our friends Tom & Toni, who we convinced to move to Oregon with us. It’s hard having friends and family that live so far away, so it was nice having a whole weekend of being with my people. And also a major win by recruiting them to pack up and head to the PNW with us so we don’t have to be so far apart. 🙂

!CW

I got my WDU query critique back this week! I won’t lie, I have been anxiously checking my email for the past three weeks. I felt like everything was riding on this critique–which is a silly notion, I know. Either (A) my query + first five were horrible and I’d have to start from scratch and be right back where I started or (B) it would be good and I could finally (and confidently) begin querying agents.

I’m so relieved to say it was the latter. I have a few minor things to tweak, but other than that, the query + first five were good. My assigned agent said she would have requested the full manuscript if she didn’t already have a few similar projects lined up. This gives me hope, because if I can interest her, surely others will be interested, right?! I’m allowing myself a day to celebrate (and breathe a sigh of relief) and then I’m sitting down tomorrow with an excel spreadsheet and mapping out my query attack.

All in all the webinar was definitely worth it. A lot of the information on the query process I had heard before through researching, but if you’re just beginning to research, it’s a great resource to learn a lot all in one go. And the one-on-one agent feedback is invaluable. You can see all the upcoming WDU workshops here.

I’m thinking about writing a whole post on what I’ve learned after I’ve sent out queries, if anyone would be interested. I feel pretty confident about my understanding of the “how to”, but I want to wait until I’ve sent my queries into the slush piles and see how I fare. Request for fulls? Silent rejections? Offers of rep? Who knows, but I’ll keep you posted. Thanks for coming on this journey with me.

Cheers,
Erin Connor

What In the World Did I Just Write

editing

It’s been 10 months since I wrote that elated post about completing Death Becoming. And boy, has it been an editing rollercoaster. Writing? I love. Editing? Not so much. I got about 30,000 words into writing my sequel before I forced myself to stop getting ahead of myself and get back to the nitty gritty of editing what will (hopefully) be my debut. (And without it, the sequel will be dead in the water.)

First, I secured myself a few betas readers via reddit. This has been one of hardest yet most rewarding parts of the editing process. I’ve always had friends read my writing, They’re the best cheerleaders you could ask for, and I couldn’t have gotten to the finish line without them. But… They’re completely biased. Which is where a good beta comes in. Nothing like having a complete stranger rip your baby to shreds, line by line, all while you smile and say thank you. The weirdest part is I enjoyed it. Brutal honesty that makes my story the best it can be? Yes, please!

After getting beta feedback, I went back and did almost a full rewrite of the manuscript. I allowed myself brief glances at scenes before settling in in front of the blank page once more and seeing what stuck and what superfluous storylines went by the wayside. Sounds like a lot of work (it was) but just making line edits felt like I was creating Frankenstein’s monster and somewhere along the way the heart of the story got lost. And in the end, I’m glad I did it.

Now, I didn’t go to school for this, so I’m basically flying by the seat of my pants at all times and hoping no one notices. Every book’s editing process is different, and every writer’s process is different, but I’d love to hear what others are doing. I’ve done JK Rowling’s plot point flow chart and I’ve made countless lists. For my next run through, I’m thinking about tackling Susan Dennard’s hefty, yet beautifully color coded, revision system. Has anyone tried it? Any other methods you find useful?

Four Novels, Four Years

Last night, February 6, 2017, at approximately 11:15PM, I finished my fourth novel, Death Becoming. I can’t fully describe the feeling that accompanies writing the final words of your novel, this digital amassing of letters and words that formed ideas that created characters and plots that often feel more real to you than the earth around you, all accumulating into this world that exists only inside your own brain, spilling out of you onto digital pages in sluggish sentences or unstoppable surges.

I’ve come to describe it as a “writer’s high”, where your hands are shaking with the words itching to burst forth from your fingertips, your vision going blurry at the edges as you tunnel vision into your fictional world. (Though perhaps that’s just my terrible eyesight.)

I had that high as I completely scrapped the final scene of my novel, one that had been sitting unfinished for nearly a month, haunting me like an old ghost. The road ahead is full of editing, rewriting, and the painful process of scrapping scenes near and dear to my heart, but not the plot. But it’s done. It’s all written down.

As “done” as I can feel, considering it’s only the first book in the series. But hey, baby steps. The dreaded final scene is done, and the stage is set for book two. Today, I celebrate.

What do you do when you find yourself stuck on a scene? How do you beat writer’s block? Do you scrap it and start over? Do you force yourself forward, one painstaking word at a time-half of which you delete as you go? Do you have a pre-writing ritual that gets the inspiration flowing? Let’s chat.

writers-block